Category Archives: Review

Adrift on the Sea of Rains – Ian Sales

Adrift on the Sea of Rains is the first novella in Ian Sales’ Apollo Quartet. An alternate history in which the Apollo programme didn’t fizzle out in the disappointing manner that it did. The US has a permanent presence on … Continue reading

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The Testament of Jessie Lamb – Jane Rogers

Jane Rogers novel, The Testament of Jessie Lamb, opens with a young woman introducing herself and her story. She is being held against her will, though at this stage it is by no means clear by whom. It is also … Continue reading

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Heart of Iron – Ekaterina Sedia

Ekaterina Sedia’s Heart of Iron, an alternate history novel (in this the Russian Decemberists revolt of 1825 was successful), follows Sasha Trubetskaya as she becomes embroiled in the growing conflict between the British, Chinese and Russian empires. Heart of Iron, … Continue reading

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Osama – Lavie Tidhar

I had been looking forward to this one for a while, but the pleasures of an insanely huge TBR pile have meant that I’ve only got around to reading it this month. Which, now that I have got around to … Continue reading

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Red Shift – Alan Garner

I’ve noted my love of Alan Garner’s fiction more than once here (and IRL). I remember Red Shift as being my favourite of his. Re-reading it has done nothing to quell my enthusiasm; what I do realise, though, is that … Continue reading

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Sarah Hall – The Carhullan Army

Sarah Hall’s The Carhullan Army won the Torque Control Future Classics by women last year. Readers of Torque Control are, naturally, erudite and possess excellent taste; despite this, I have to confess that I’d resisted reading this one for a … Continue reading

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The Willows – Algernon Blackwood

Algernon Blackwood is one of the author’s with whom I was familiar although, I realise having read this, not familiar enough. In The Willows, the narrator and his companion (‘the Swede’) are paddling up the Danube. The river of this … Continue reading

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